Into the Zeppelin (Hollow Earth Expedition Ssn1 ep23a)

This is an ongoing story about a lost world of hungry dinosaurs, sinister villains, and non-stop action. If you’re new to Hollow Earth Expedition, I suggest starting at the beginning.

 

 

 

 

The shove from the lantern-jawed lieutenant almost made Celeste fall to the ground. It was hard enough walking in her new, oversized boots without Nazi bullies pushing her around. They were not forgiving about what had happened out in the jungle, even though she kept telling them it wasn’t her fault: the one soldier had been stabbed by a spear before she even got to the scene, and the other had been eaten by a dinosaur. Yet nothing she said made a difference: the Nazis just weren’t interested in being open-minded.

At least they had offered her one kindness: a change of clothing. When she had arrived in the command post, the lieutenant had shoved a bundled-up gray uniform into her arms and pointed to a bush which was to serve as her dressing room. The uniform proved to be too tight in the hips and the chest and too baggy everywhere else, but it was better than her red dress, which had been torn, muddied, and chewed-on to the point of near-indecency. Celeste had also been glad to find that the uniform had been carefully stripped of all badges, insignias, and swastikas. Unfortunately, they wouldn’t give her a mirror to examine herself in the outfit, so all she could do was tie her hair back with a strip of her tattered red dress and hope for the best. Under these circumstances, “Stunning” or “beautiful” were certainly out of the question, but maybe she could hope for “tomboy-cute.” Then she remembered how the soldiers in camp had greeted her with hungry stares, and she buttoned the uniform shirt up to the very top.

They wouldn’t tell her where they took Jack or what they were planning to do with him, but she gathered that she was being sent up to the zeppelin to see someone named Commandant von Wartenburg. For some reason, all the soldiers spoke that name in a hushed whisper, and it made her feel like she had been typecast yet again in the role of damsel in distress.

With the zeppelin floating high above the city, the only way up or down was a small metal platform rigged up to a winch by fifty foot cables. At gunpoint, she climbed on and gripped the ropes until her knuckles turned white. As it ascended, the platform swung sickeningly back and forth in the slightest breeze, which made her grip the ropes even tighter, until the whiteness spread from her knuckles all the way out to her wrists.

At first she closed her eyes, but that made the sea-sickness worse, so she kept them fixed on the looming black blimp above her. It was a huge vehicle, built rugged for military use. From the scaffolding encircling its rounded sides protruded several propeller engines, now silent. A thick chain anchored the tip of its pointy nose to the peak of a tall, ornately carved obelisk projecting up from the city. A compact biplane hung from the underside of the zeppelin like a baby bat clinging to its mother’s belly. The zeppelin’s carriage was flat, angular, and black with visible rivets and small windows that could be quickly shuttered with armored flaps. This section contained all the equipment and troop quarters and yet made up only a small proportion of the overall vehicle.

As Celeste was pulled into the cargo bay, she felt as though she were being swallowed by a gargantuan beast—a feeling which had become distressingly familiar.

 

 

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Hollow Earth Expedition was created by Jeff Combos and is property of Exile Game Studio. For more Hollow Earth Expedition action, check out ExileGames.com

About Sechin Tower

Sechin Tower is a teacher, game developer, and author of MAD SCIENCE INSTITUTE, a novel of creatures, calamities, and college matriculation. He lives in Seattle, Washington.
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